Service-Oriented Architecture: Analysis & Design for Services and Microservices (Second Edition)

Acknowledgments
Reader Services
Chapter 1: Introduction

1.1 How Patterns Are Used in this Book
1.2 Series Books That Cover Topics from the First Edition
1.3 How this Book Is Organized
Part I: Fundamentals
Chapter 3, Understanding Service-Orientation.
Chapter 4, Understanding SOA
Chapter 5, Understanding Layers with Services and Microservices
Part II: Service-Oriented Analysis and Design.
Chapter 6, Analysis and Modeling with Web Services and Microservices
Chapter 7, Analysis and Modeling with REST Services and Microservices
Chapter 8, Service API and Contract Design with Web Services
Chapter 9, Service API and Contract Design with REST Services and Microservices.
Chapter 10, Service API and Contract Versioning with Web Services and REST Services
Part III: Appendices
Appendix A, Service-Orientation Principles Reference
Appendix B, REST Constraints Reference
Appendix C, SOA Design Patterns Reference
Appendix D, The Annotated SOA Manifesto.
1.4 Page References and Capitalization for Principles, Constraints, and Patterns.
Additional Information
Symbol Legend
Updates, Errata, and Resources (www.servicetechbooks.com)
Service-Orientation (www.serviceorientation.com)
What Is REST? (www.whatisrest.com)
Referenced Specifications (www.servicetechspecs.com).
SOASchool.com® SOA Certified Professional (SOACP)
CloudSchool.com™ Cloud Certified Professional (CCP)
BigDataScienceSchool.com™ Big Data Science Certified
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Notification Service

Chapter 2: Case Study Backgrounds

2.1 How Case Studies Are Used.
2.2 Case Study Background #1: Transit Line Systems, Inc.
2.3 Case Study Background #2: Midwest University Association

PART I: FUNDAMENTALS
Chapter 3: Understanding Service-Orientation

3.1 Introduction to Service-Orientation
Services in Business Automation.
Services Are Collections of Capabilities
Service-Orientation as a Design Paradigm
Service-Orientation Design Principles
3.2 Problems Solved by Service-Orientation
Silo-based Application Architecture.
It Can Be Highly Wasteful.
It’s Not as Efficient as It Appears
It Bloats an Enterprise
It Can Result in Complex Infrastructures and Convoluted
Enterprise Architectures
Integration Becomes a Constant Challenge
The Need for Service-Orientation
Increased Amounts of Reusable Solution Logic
Reduced Amounts of Application-Specific Logic
Reduced Volume of Logic Overall
Inherent Interoperability
3.3 Effects of Service-Orientation on the Enterprise
Service-Orientation and the Concept of “Application”.
Service-Orientation and the Concept of “Integration”
The Service Composition
3.4 Goals and Benefits of Service-Oriented Computing
Increased Intrinsic Interoperability
Increased Federation
Increased Vendor Diversification Options
Increased Business and Technology Domain Alignment
Increased ROI
Increased Organizational Agility
Reduced IT Burden
3.5 Four Pillars of Service-Orientation.
Teamwork
Education
Discipline
Balanced Scope.

Chapter 4: Understanding SOA.

Introduction to SOA
4.1 The Four Characteristics of SOA
Business-Driven
Vendor-Neutral
Enterprise-Centric
Composition-Centric
Design Priorities
4.2 The Four Common Types of SOA
Service Architecture
Service Composition Architecture
Service Inventory Architecture
Service-Oriented Enterprise Architecture
4.3 The End Result of Service-Orientation and SOA.
4.4 SOA Project and Lifecycle Stages
Methodology and Project Delivery Strategies
SOA Project Stages
SOA Adoption Planning
Service Inventory Analysis
Service-Oriented Analysis (Service Modeling)
Step 1: Define Business Automation Requirements
Step 2: Identify Existing Automation Systems.
Step 3: Model Candidate Services
Service-Oriented Design (Service Contract)
Service Logic Design.
Service Development
Service Testing.
Service Deployment and Maintenance
Service Usage and Monitoring.
Service Discovery
Service Versioning and Retirement
Project Stages and Organizational Roles

Chapter 5: Understanding Layers with Services and Microservices

5.1 Introduction to Service Layers
Service Models and Service Layers.
Service and Service Capability Candidates.
5.2 Breaking Down the Business Problem
Functional Decomposition
Service Encapsulation
Agnostic Context
Agnostic Capability
Utility Abstraction
Entity Abstraction
Non-Agnostic Context
Micro Task Abstraction and Microservices
Process Abstraction and Task Services.
5.3 Building Up the Service-Oriented Solution
Service-Orientation and Service Composition.
Capability Composition and Capability Recomposition
Capability Composition.
Capability Composition and Microservices
Capability Recomposition
Logic Centralization and Service Normalization

PART II: SERVICE-ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Chapter 6: Analysis and Modeling with Web Services and Microservices

6.1 Web Service Modeling Process
Case Study Example
Step 1: Decompose the Business Process
(into Granular Actions)
Case Study Example
Step 2: Filter Out Unsuitable Actions
Case Study Example
Step 3: Define Entity Service Candidates
Case Study Example
Step 4: Identify Process-Specific Logic.
Case Study Example
Step 5: Apply Service-Orientation
Step 6: Identify Service Composition Candidates
Case Study Example
Step 7: Analyze Processing Requirements
Case Study Example
Step 8: Define Utility Service Candidates
Case Study Example
Step 9: Define Microservice Candidates
Case Study Example
Step 10: Apply Service-Orientation
Step 11: Revise Service Composition Candidates.
Case Study Example
Step 12: Revise Capability Candidate Grouping

Chapter 7: Analysis and Modeling with REST Services and Microservices

7.1 REST Service Modeling Process
Case Study Example
Step 1: Decompose Business Process (into Granular Actions)
Case Study Example
Step 2: Filter Out Unsuitable Actions
Case Study Example
Step 3: Define Entity Service Candidates
Case Study Example
Step 4: Identify Process-Specific Logic.
Case Study Example
Step 5: Identify Resources
Case Study Example
Step 6: Associate Service Capabilities with Resources and Methods
Case Study Example
Step 7: Apply Service-Orientation
Case Study Example
Step 8: Identify Service Composition Candidates
Case Study Example
Step 9: Analyze Processing Requirements
Case Study Example
Step 10: Define Utility Service Candidates (and Associate Resources and Methods).
Case Study Example
Step 11: Define Microservice Candidates (and Associate Resources and Methods).
Case Study Example
Step 12: Apply Service-Orientation
Step 13: Revise Candidate Service Compositions.
Case Study Example
Step 14: Revise Resource Definitions and Capability
Candidate Grouping.
7.2 Additional Considerations
Uniform Contract Modeling and REST Service Inventory Modeling
REST Constraints and Uniform Contract Modeling
REST Service Capability Granularity
Resources vs. Entities

Chapter 8: Service API and Contract Design with Web Services

8.1 Service Model Design Considerations
Entity Service Design
Utility Service Design
Microservice Design
Task Service Design
Case Study Example
8.2 Web Service Design Guidelines
Apply Naming Standards.
Apply a Suitable Level of Contract API Granularity
Case Study Example
Design Web Service Operations to Be Inherently Extensible
Case Study Example
Consider Using Modular WSDL Documents
Case Study Example
Use Namespaces Carefully
Case Study Example
Use the SOAP Document and Literal Attribute Values.
Case Study Example

Chapter 9: Service API and Contract Design with REST Services and Microservices.

9.1 Service Model Design Considerations
Entity Service Design
Utility Service Design
Microservice Design
Task Service Design.
Case Study Example
9.2 REST Service Design Guidelines
Uniform Contract Design Considerations.
Designing and Standardizing Methods
Designing and Standardizing HTTP Headers
Designing and Standardizing HTTP Response Codes
Customizing Response Codes.
Designing Media Types
Designing Schemas for Media Types
Complex Method Design
Stateless Complex Methods.
Fetch Method
Store Method.
Delta Method.
Async Method
Stateful Complex Methods
Trans Method
PubSub Method
Case Study Example

Chapter 10: Service API and Contract Versioning with Web Services and REST Services

10.1 Versioning Basics
Versioning Web Services
Versioning REST Services
Fine and Coarse-Grained Constraints
10.2 Versioning and Compatibility.
Backwards Compatibility
Backwards Compatibility in Web Services
Backwards Compatibility in REST Services
Forwards Compatibility.
Compatible Changes
Incompatible Changes.
10.3 REST Service Compatibility Considerations
10.4 Version Identifiers
10.5 Versioning Strategies.
The Strict Strategy (New Change, New Contract)
Pros and Cons.
The Flexible Strategy (Backwards Compatibility).
Pros and Cons.
The Loose Strategy (Backwards and Forwards Compatibility)
Pros and Cons.
Strategy Summary
10.6 REST Service Versioning Considerations

PART III: APPENDICES
APPENDIX A: Service-Orientation Principles Reference
APPENDIX B: REST Constraints Reference.
APPENDIX C: SOA Design Patterns Reference
APPENDIX D: The Annotated SOA Manifesto.
About the Author
Index
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